Tag Archives: canada

Niagara Falls

As you probably already know, I have the opportunity every once in a while to travel to some pretty awesome places, thanks to my job in the Toxic Waste Division of Zombie and Poltergeist Prevention, Inc. A few weeks ago I was sent to Canada for the third time in a year.  This was by far the best trip of the three, but that probably wasn’t hard to do. Let me esplain. No, there is too much. Let me sum up.

I went to Ontario in December. Yes. You read that correctly. Ontario. in DECEMBER. Typical flight delays occurred, in addition to my baggage getting left in Toronto (where I was NOT), my rental car was given away, the first taxi I called ended up upside down in a ditch, and the second taxi I called only took cash (which I only had American, but he was happy to have it). When I got to my hotel late that night, I ordered dinner at the hotel restaurant which was also cash only. I had used all of my cash on my taxi. I wasn’t sure if I should laugh or cry by this point, but a Good Samaritan in the hotel restaurant bought my dinner for me, and turned the entire trip around. The rest of the trip was uneventful.

I went to Alberta in April. You have to remember something. There isn’t a Spring Season in Canada. There is Winter and there is Summer. April is still Winter. While I was trying to follow my site contact to the property, he was driving 100 kph (about 80 mph) THROUGH A SNOWSTORM.  Although I was able to take some beautiful photos and see some beautiful country, the entire province was covered in snow and ice.  Being from Texas, I could only stand that for so long.

But this time, I was in Ontario and Quebec in the last week of September and first week of October. It was gorgeous. The leaves were at their peek for fall colors, and I drove a lot of miles through beautiful country. A LOT OF MILES. 730 miles, actually. And that doesn’t even include the mileage to and from my hotels – that is simply from the airport, to my sites, and back to the airport. All in 5 days.

I did, however, find time for a little fun. See, when you are traveling to or from Canada, it takes ALL DAY. I couldn’t plan for my work day to be done and get to the airport by noon, and then try to fly home that same day. First of all, if I had planned that then something would have gone wrong and I would have missed my flight. There is just not enough wiggle room to do that, and when you aren’t flying Southwest, things need A LOT MORE WIGGLE ROOM. With Southwest you can just hop on an early flight home if you want. Not with other airlines. You have change fees, cancellation fees, PIA fees, and whatever other fees they feel like tacking on. So I gave myself ample time to travel home on Friday, and save the headache.  But because I had extra time on Thursday, I took advantage of my close proximity and was able to visit Niagara Falls.

It was A. MAZ. ING.

Niagara Falls
Niagara Falls

I know what you are thinking. “I have seen pictures of this my whole life. It’s a big waterfall. Meh.”

Seriously, you are wrong. And I know just HOW WRONG you are, because I thought the same thing. I thought, “I have seen waterfalls, and I have seen pictures of Niagara. There is not a real reason to go up there.” Oh man, I was DEAD WRONG.

Niagara Falls, with Maid of the Mist for scale
Niagara Falls, with Maid of the Mist for scale

You don’t realize how MASSIVE the falls are until you see them. Until you hear them. There are people walking and talking behind you, and you can barely hear them over the raging water. Even the size of the river itself was amazing. If I had seen a river like that in Texas, I would assume there had just been a massive flooding even, and the river had breached its banks.

Shipwreck on the Niagara River
There is even a missive shipwreck on the Niagara River, known as the “Old Scow”

As I stood in awe of the river and the falls, I literally zoned out and heard nothing but the raging water. I was almost brought to tears by the beauty. Just across the street was a pub with outdoor seating, so I sat down and ordered a while and watched the falls. I also had a cell phone signal from the US, so I called Hubby without international charges (SCORE!) and played on facebook a while. Then my dear sis-in-law asked me a very interesting question: “Are you staying to watch them light up the falls?”

WHAT??? I don’t even know what that means, but YES I’m staying for that!

I was going to have to wait until 7 pm, but I couldn’t leave when it was so close! So I waited at the restaurant for a while, then I decided to head back to my car to get my coat before it got too cold. By that time I was starting to have second thoughts. I still had a while before sundown, and as I did the math in my head, I realized that I was going to be paying at least $25 in parking. Dang. That’s not cheap. And I was mad at myself for not parking in the $18 lot originally, because I was pretty sure that was for all day. My lot was $5 per hour. I was going to do good on parking prices until I realized I was going to stay so much longer. And then my foot started to hurt. Bad. Hubby and I had run 4 miles a couple days before, and since I had hurt my back in the beginning of the Summer, I hadn’t been running. So that 4 mile run really did a number on my foot. I couldn’t imagine walking all the way to my car to get my jacket, all the way back to the falls, and then ALL THE WAY BACK TO MY CAR AGAIN after the light show! So regrettably, I limped back to my car, stopped in the botanical garden to take some pictures and rest my poor foot, and got ready to head to my hotel.

A greenhouse I was definitely jealous of!
A greenhouse I was definitely jealous of!
Adorable sculpture of a boy ride a snapping turtle
Adorable sculpture of a boy ride a snapping turtle
Beautiful Japanese Maple, starting to turn from green to red
Beautiful Japanese Maple, starting to turn from green to red
Roses of every color!
Roses of every color!
pink fuchsia flowers
pink fuchsia flowers

And then a miracle happened.

There wasn’t a guy in the pay booth. The gate was open. The tenant of the parking lot was gone! FREE PARKING!! I even waited for a couple minutes to make sure he wasn’t walking back up to the booth or something, but he was officially GONE. Now, I know you know that I love a good deal. A free, my friends, is the best deal you can get.

I headed back to the falls, planning on parking much closer. I was willing to pay $5/30 minutes to park super close to the falls, now that I wasn’t going to be there much longer. But then I saw something even better. MORE FREE PARKING. Holy crap on a cracker! At the pub where I had relaxed earlier, there was a free lot. This was Karma’s way of telling me that I needed to stay a little longer to appreciate the beauty of the world, and I obliged! And this is what I waited to see. Magic.

New York, USA, the American Falls
New York, USA, the American Falls
Horseshoe Falls, the falls that separate the US from Canada
Horseshoe Falls, the falls that separate the US from Canada
the lights changed color every few minutes
the lights changed color every few minutes

308

300

 

I didn’t stay much later than sunset, because I still had to drive to my hotel, but this just makes me want to take Hubby to see this, so we can do the Maid of the Mist tour and stay much later so I can get better pictures! (Also I hadn’t brought my tripod because of packing restrictions, so I will have that too!)

By the time I got to my hotel I was exhausted, and I had to get up at 5 a.m. the next morning to make my flight, but it was so worth it.

Wolves in Yellowstone: An Ecology Lesson

I have always been a biologist at heart. When I was a little girl I would constantly be looking at bugs and plants, and learning as much as I could about the world around me. I understood at a very young age how the natural world works together – everything having a niche in which it belonged. You throw one thing out of whack, and the balance is thrown off around it. I’m not sure why other people don’t understand this, because it seems like perfect, common sense that even a child could figure out, so why do people continue to do things like hunt the whales to extinction or organize rattlesnake roundups?

One example is the wolves in the United States. Once upon a time, not very long ago, people began to populate the wild areas of the northwestern United States.  Ranching was the reason for the move – Wide Open Spaces and untouched grazing. It was a paradise for ranchers. Except for the wolves. Every once in a while a wolf would find a nice fat calf as an easy meal. Result? The ranchers started killing wolves to protect their livestock. Then the government got involved. The government hired trappers in an attempt to annihilate the wolves. Literally. That was their goal – kill off all the wolves. What good did wolves do, anyway? We didn’t NEED wolves here. All they did was kill innocent livestock and wildlife that WE wanted to kill and eat. So the government answer was to kill off the competition.  Bears were also deemed a nuisance as well, and were also on the trapper hit list, but mainly because they eat the fish and crops that people were eating too. Wolves were extirpated from most of the United States is a matter of a few decades.

The plan to eradicate the wolves backfired however, and the best place to see the results of that backfire was in Yellowstone National Park. The land is still (pretty much) untouched and natural, and is a great place for grad students to do research 🙂

See, over the years that there were no wolves in the park, a lot of things changed. The elk population skyrocketed. So much so that in the winter the elk were having to be fed hay by the park rangers so that there weren’t massive die-offs from starvation. The massive elk population was killing the aspen trees by grazing them down to nothing, preventing new forest from replacing the old trees and fire-killed trees. Elk were also killing other species of trees by rubbing their antlers on them so much that it was ripping the bark from the trees and allowing insects the chance to infest the trees. Elk were grazing everything down to nothing because of their massive numbers.

In 1995 when 14 wolves were trapped in Alberta, Canada and brought to Yellowstone National Park, it was deemed an “experimental population” and they were radio-collared and watched closely to see what would happen.

Here is a quick video that can describe it much better than I can, and the sound of the wolves howling always gives me chills, so I love this video.

While Hubby and I were on vacation in Yellowstone, we saw, personally, the changes that the wolves had made.

Yellowstone May 2014 1246

These pines have clear damage by elk from scraping the velvet off of their antlers every spring. Notice the dead tree in the foreground which also has the same scars from the elk. This tree was likely killed by insects boring into the soft phloem underneath.

Since the return of the wolf, the elk have started avoiding certain areas where they were easy prey, allowing the aspen trees a second chance to grow and repopulate. We actually saw some areas of aspen trees that were fenced off, and the area appeared to be a research site to study different dynamics of the aspens. (Unfortunately when we saw it, we were on our way to the doctor’s office because of my back, so we didn’t really stop to get a closer look.)

One of the areas that the elk seemed to avoid was Lamar Valley. We saw hundreds of bison, bears, and pronghorn, but no elk.

The most beautiful place in the park - Lamar Valley. Herds of bison and antelope throughout the valley.
The most beautiful place in the park – Lamar Valley. Herds of bison and antelope throughout the valley.

Other species have also benefited from the return of the wolf, like the grizzly and black bears.  For example, they feed on the left-overs of wolf kills (bears aren’t nearly as fast as wolves, so it is much harder for them to chase down prey), and this has led to an increase in the bear populations as well, after the government trappers attempted to wipe them out too.

"Scar Face" feeding on a wolf kill
“Scar Face” feeding on a wolf kill

Today, the wolf population is still studied by the park service; however due to budget cuts, most (if not all) research is conducted on a voluntary basis.  Because of this, things like helicopters are no longer used to dart the wolves because it’s not in the budget. Instead, the wolves are trapped or netted first. This is increasing the amount of human interaction the wolves have, and making them nervous around people where they once had little fear.  That means that often, when you see a wolf in the park, it will run away instead of letting you marvel in all their splendor.

Ranger Rick performs his wolf surveys voluntarily, because the wolf monitoring program budget has been cut.
Ranger Rick performs his wolf surveys voluntarily, because the wolf monitoring program budget has been cut.

Additionally, maintenance of the radio equipment has declined.

Clear view of his radio collar
Clear view of his radio collar

The silver male wolf that we watched on our last morning in the park had a radio collar, but the battery was dead and it was no longer emitting a signal. Because of this, he could not be identified or tracked, and all the potential data that he was producing were going unrecorded. This means that we don’t know if he is part of a pack or if he is a “lone wolf” (sorry, I had to). We don’t know if he has sired any pups, contributing to the growth of the population. We don’t know where his territory or range are, what his diet is, if he is healthy, or any other multitude of ecological questions, that at least for now, must go unanswered.

This is a wonderful story, but it has only been half written. As the wolf populations continue to rise in Yellowstone and other areas outside of the park, clashes with the human population is inevitable.  The state of Idaho was attempting to start legalizing wolf hunts again, right after they were brought back from the brink of extinction in the United States. Bowing to public pressure, they have decided that they won’t start wolf hunts this year. The wolves are safe. For now.

As a biologist, I believe that we need to learn as much as possible about the wolves in order to save them again. Learning their habits, territories, ranges, diets, and even personalities can teach us so much and help us understand how to prevent human or livestock interactions. Would something as simple as adding guard dogs or guard donkeys/mules (yes, that’s a thing) to the herds be enough to keep wolves away? How many TRUE wolf kills of livestock actually happen per year? What is the economic “loss” caused by wolves?

Personally, I don’t think that the ranchers have a reason to despise the wolves, because the ranchers, like any other business owner, should have insurance.  And insurance pays out for damages/losses, So they don’t have a REAL reason to want the wolves gone.

As Apex Predators, wolves affect everything around them. They are vital for the health of the ecosystems in which they evolved. This means that the other wildlife are healthier as a result. Bigger, stronger, and healthier elk, deer, bison, and antelope survive while the wolves cull the herds of the sick and weak individuals.  Humans need to stop trying to “manage” the wildlife and just leave it be. It will balance out on its own, and be healthier than if we decide which individuals are killed and which populations are “too high”.

If you want to see wildlife with extremely limited human interference, watch this video on the wolves of Chernobyl. I watched this and it made me want to live there. So there is radiation, big deal. I can wear a respirator for the rest of my life if that means I can live in a place that is a wildlife paradise and no humans will bother me.  In the video, they determined that the wolf population is healthy, and no higher or lower than in other wolf habitat areas, meaning they don’t need to be managed – their numbers didn’t “get out of control” without human intervention. They didn’t “eat all of the deer” in the area. The ecosystem is healthy without human interference. Just like it was before we evolved – the world doesn’t need humans to take care of it. The world just needs humans not to destroy it.

Sunset in Lamar Valley
Sunset in Lamar Valley

Canada Photography

It has been a while since I have written, but basically that’s because not many note-worthy events have occurred lately. I was recently sent back to Canada (this time it was -2 degrees C instead of -23 degrees C!) but the trip was relatively uneventful – no lost baggage, no crashing taxis, and no missing rental car. It all went pretty smooth. I was up there doing A LOT of traveling, so between my different projects that I had going on for the week, I was able to sneak in some photography opportunities.

Being that it was the very beginning of Spring, there wasn’t much in the way of wildlife, although I did see two coyotes (and heard a whole pack somewhere in the distance)

Coyote on a frozen pond
Coyote on a frozen pond

and I saw two snowshoe hares (a new mammal species for me!).

A happy pair of snowshoe hares
A happy pair of snowshoe hares
Snowshoe hare
Snowshoe hare

I also got to see a Bald Eagle but didn’t get a great picture of it, because by the time I realized what I was looking at and took the time to stop the car and grab the camera, he had already soared to distant skies. I was on a mission to see a Snowy Owl while I was in Alberta, but that didn’t happen, although I did see a very interesting nest that I was hoping someone would be able to help me identify!

Mystery Nest - Check out how it is built AROUND the branch, so it's more like a wreath....?
Mystery Nest – Check out how it is built AROUND the branch, so it’s more like a wreath….?

I also SWORE I saw a wolf out in a field hunting mice in the snow. My heart started pounding and I did a quick U-turn and grabbed my camera. Turns out it was wearing a collar. And was a German Shepherd. But I was right about the whole hunting mice in the snow thing, so that’s worth something, right? And hey, it was snowing pretty hard too.

The "wolf" I saw
The “wolf” I saw

Also the whole area was covered up in horses. And I’m talking huge draft horses everywhere. I got to see some great ones, of all different breeds:

Clydesdales
Curious Clydesdales
Gypsy Vanner
Handsome Gypsy Vanner
Beautiful Percheron
Beautiful Percheron

But the best one was the very first one I saw. He was a monster. He was a beauty.

I think his name should be Sampson.
I think his name should be Sampson.

I’m positive, just by looking at his huge chest, that he’s regularly used to pull sleds in the winter. He was probably the biggest horse I have ever seen. And I was in love. I wanted to take him home and cuddle him. I wanted to jump the fence and go riding. He was spectacular.

Handsome Sampson
Handsome Sampson
Sampson and Delilah
Sampson and Delilah

There is also a very common barn style that is beautiful but doesn’t seem to last (or all the barns were super old), because they all seemed to be falling apart.

Beautiful Old Barn
Beautiful Old Barn
Falling down barn
Falling down barn

 

Falling down barn
Falling down barn
Barn and horses
Barn and horses
Falling Apart Red Barn
Falling Apart Red Barn

And on my last full day I was blessed with a gorgeous sunrise through the fog. I even had time to pull over onto a side road and get some good photos of the sunrise over a farm.

Pink Farmhouse Sunrise
Pink Farmhouse Sunrise
Pink Foggy Sunrise
Pink Foggy Sunrise
Foggy Sunrise
Foggy Sunrise

And finally I found an old truck graveyard that was really neat to see!

Coca Cola Truck
Coca Cola Truck
Sun Reflecting off of the windshield
Sun Reflecting off of the windshield
Cool Old Trucks in the Snow
Cool Old Trucks in the Snow
Old Coca Cola Truck
Old Coca Cola Truck
Cool Old Trucks
Cool Old Trucks

It was a great trip, and I think I got some great photos. I can’t wait until I get my new computer with Photoshop on it so I can play with the different filters and everything, and make these photos really pop. Some of these pictures were taken in the middle of the day so the sunlight reflecting off of the snow was really too bright for taking photos, but I thought, “hey, how often am I going to be in Alberta? I gotta take these photos while I can!”

I hope you enjoyed my trip as much as I did!

Why I Love Canadians

My Canada trip started out pretty rough.

But the saving grace for the entire trip was that I was in Canada. You know what else is in Canada?

Canadians.

I swear, they are the nicest people you will ever meet.

They go out of their way to make you feel welcome and comfortable. It’s quite refreshing.

After my terrible first day, things started looking up.

My baggage showed up in the middle of the night…

My warm clothes!

And even though I had asked them to, the front desk people didn’t call me at 1 am to tell me it was here. And you know what? I’m glad they made that decision – what was I going to do with that information at 1 am? Run down and get my bag? No, I would have said ok, great. I’ll pick it up in the morning. So why call and wake me up about it? Better to just let me sleep and figure it out later. They are so nice.

I found out that my rental car wasn’t going to be ready until 10 am. I notified the people I was in town to see, and instead of waiting around all day for me to show up, they offered to pick me up at my hotel and take me to the property. Nice warm truck being driven by someone who knew where they were going? I’m in.

And when I was done for the day, he dropped me off at the rental car place. And this was my rental car…

Super Awesome Rental Car
Super Awesome Rental Car

They said that because I was so nice and patient with them since they had run out of cars the day before, they were only charging me for an economy car, but gave me an All Wheel Drive Kia Sorrento.

And a free GPS Rental.

See! When you are nice, nice things happen!

However, I didn’t have time to go see the polar bears.

It was an hour drive and they close early in the winter, so instead I drove to nearby Hersey Lake and took some photos, adding 4 new species to my bird list in the meantime!

Ruffed Grouse
Ruffed Grouse
Black-capped Chickadee
Black-capped Chickadee
Hairy Woodpecker
Hairy Woodpecker
Red breasted Nuthatch
Red breasted Nuthatch

And I also got to see something completely new and foreign to me…

Hersey Lake, frozen solid
Hersey Lake, frozen solid

First time in my life I had seen a lake frozen solid. It kind of scared me, I’m not going to lie. I was sure if I ventured too close to the edge I would fall through, even though those are snow-mobile tracks going across the middle of it!

Snowy path around the lake
Snowy path around the lake
Sunset and snow
Sunset and snow
Birch Trees
Birch Trees
Birch Trees in the Snow
Birch Trees in the Snow

I met up with John again in the hotel bar that evening. The hotel staff were all having their staff Christmas Party, so it was me and him watching hockey in the bar and showing each other pictures of our dogs.

I had told him the night before after he so kindly paid for my dinner, that I would pay him back the next night. I’m sure he thought I had forgotten, but I always try to keep my word so I made sure to meet up with him again. Since the hotel staff were having their Christmas party and the restaurant was closed, we went to The Restaurant (I’m not making that up).

It was a dive restaurant (my favorite!) that was attached to a gas station.

I told John that I had to have the traditional Canadian dish of french fried and gravy, what the Canadians call Poutine. He said that The Restaurant was the best place in town for that, so that’s where I wanted him to take me.

Poutine
Poutine

We didn’t realize that they were close to closing when we walked in, but we ordered our Poutine (Quebec style, with cheese curds) and a couple sodas and sat and talked for a good while. There aren’t many people that I can just sit and talk to as if I have known them for years, so it was nice to be able to do that after I had had such a crappy trip.

After dinner the waitress came and got our plates with her purse in her hand, ready to go. We didn’t even notice that she was waiting on us! We got out as fast as we could and apologized over and over for making her wait. I paid for dinner like I told him I would, and then he asked if I had ever been to Tim Horton’s.

I had never heard of Tim Horton’s.

But apparently it’s another Canadian thing to do.

We ordered our coffee (decaf since it was like 9 pm by this time) and John had me pick out a Christmas ornament. He refused to let me pay for the coffee and ornament, saying, “it’s Christmas!”

Then he gave me a “toonie” which is the Canadian $2 coin, because he wanted to make sure I had actually seen a Polar Bear on my trip.

toonie

Again, we sat and talked like old friends, and enjoyed our coffee. He talked about once when he thought his eye was about to pop out of his head and I talked about when both my eardrums blew out in grad school. Then we discussed the differences of healthcare in Canada and in The US. It was great. John said that he had been trying really hard to NOT say “ahe?” the whole time (he apparently wasn’t doing a very good job of it because it was like every sentence) because “it’s so typically Canadian,” but all I did was laugh and say something along the lines of “I think it’s fine – you are Canadian afterall….”

The second day of my three day trip was spectacular.

John was a welcome new friend, and I hope we keep in touch.

Everyone else I met was so nice and made me wish I lived in Canada, simply because everyone in the country is automatically your friend.

However, seeing as how this was the temperature the entire time I was there…

That's in Fahrenheit.
That’s in Fahrenheit.

…I don’t plan on making the move any time soon.

Planes, Trains, and Automobiles

The Steve Martin/John Candy movie always seemed a little depressing to me. One guy keeps getting screwed over and the other guy doesn’t see anything wrong with that.  Well, today that movie seems to have come to fruition, and I’m Steve Martin.

planes_trains_and_automobiles1

It all started with Expedia.com.  I was trying to book a flight to Timmins, Ontario for work and the only way to save the budget for the project was to book through Expedia.  I was on a personal trip and attempting to book the flight from a hotel room. I was getting so frustrated because every time I selected a flight, I would go through all the hoops of selecting my flight, my seat, and everything else when I would get the next screen that would say this flight is no longer available.”

This should have been taken as a sign (Sign #1). Maybe I should have just put off the trip a little later and book it through a real airline instead of the discount site. But no. I was able to book a flight, a hotel, and a rental car, and it ONLY took 1 hour. When it should have taken 20 minutes.

I was continually getting emails from Expedia about booking my trip to Timmins. It was a little confusing because THEY of ALL PEOPLE should be well aware that I already booked my flight to Timmins, right? (Sign #2).

Yesterday I got the email to check in for my flight within 24 hours of my trip. I tried to do that and it kept saying that it couldn’t do that. Call customer service. When I tried to call customer service, this was the recording. “Thank you for calling United Airlines. We are currently experiencing a large volume of calls. All of our representatives are currently helping other customers. If it is not an emergency, try again later.” Well it wasn’t an emergency, so I wasn’t too worried about it. (Sign #3).

Then this morning I headed to the airport in Houston and tried to check in for my flight. No dice. Every time I slide my card into the card reader, it said there was no itinerary that matched my name. (Sign #4). Probably why the website wouldn’t let me check in online either. The lady behind the counter, who looked like a 4-foot tall, black, female version of Dr. Frank-N-Furter from Rocky Horror Picture Show, was not remotely helpful or in a hurry.

Seriously.
Seriously.

However, it seemed that everyone was having issues with the kiosks, so I wasn’t so worried about it (take it back to Sign #3). I was finally given one boarding pass, from Houston to Boston, and Ms. Dr. Frank-N-Furter told me these exact words, “This is your boarding pass for Boston. When you get to your gate in Boston, ask for your other boarding passes. This will get you to Boston, but your bag will go on to Timmins.”

Awesome. One less thing to worry about. So I had enough time to get through security and even grab a breakfast sandwich before I walked right onto my plane for Boston. Easy right? Of course I still had two more flights to catch…

I landed in Boston and it turned out I had to go through security again. I thought that was weird, but the only flying I usually do is domestic and small airports, so having to go from Terminal E to Terminal B, it makes sense that I would need to go through security again. No big deal. The airport was pretty awful, but I also blame this on Expedia. See, since I couldn’t check in online, I had no idea what terminal I needed at which airport. I had the flight numbers and the flight times, but that was pretty much it. I had to ask around for where I could find Air Canada, and the guy told me to go to Terminal B. Follow the signs to C Terminal, go across the street, and you’re there. Across the street? How big is this airport? So I followed the signs, found the C Terminal, and was stuck. It took me a while before I could find Terminal B, and it really was across the street. Then I had to go to the ticket counter to get my boarding passes. Not the gate like Dr. Frank-N-Furter said (because I had to go through security again) but at the ticket counter. I got my tickets and was on my way. Then the Boston TSA guy said this.

“You’re going the wrong way!”

planes_trains_automobiles

All I could think about was Planes, Trains, and Automobiles (Sign #4 again). I knew people were just saying that because it is December and I’m from Texas, and going to Canada in December is probably suicide, so I didn’t think anything of it.

The flight from Boston to Toronto wasn’t bad, even though this was my “window seat” on the plane.

My "window seat"
My “window seat”

Toronto is actually a much bigger city than I thought it was. I would love to actually spend some time there.

Toronto as far as the eye can see
Toronto as far as the eye can see

When I got off the plane in Toronto everything in the airport was very well marked and stress-free. Where it wasn’t well-marked, they had employees yelling directions of where we needed to go. Flawless. I went through Customs and security again before I got to my Terminal for my final flight of the day.

Last flight of the day
Last flight of the day

This was a tiny little Turbo Prop that we had to walk out onto the runway to board. In the snow. Granted there wasn’t much snow, but it was still about 25 degrees F outside. The plane wasn’t full, so even though it was the smallest plane of the day, I had the most room.

The plane was making me a little nervous though. There was this ear-piercing whine for most of the flight. I’m not sure if it was the particular altitude we were at, or if it was when they turned the heat on in the plane, or what, but I really thought my eardrums were going to start bleeding if it didn’t stop. Of course, as soon as I thought I couldn’t take it anymore, the shrieking stopped, and I was able to read in peace. Then when we started to descend it started again. I would have preferred a crying baby. At least you know why that sound is being made and you aren’t afraid that it’s a breach in the bulkhead.

When I landed in Timmins I went to the rental car counter to get the keys for my rental car while I waited for my luggage. Apparently they were expecting me to pick up my car at 10 am. When I was in the air between Houston and Boston.

Since I hadn’t shown up, they gave away my car. And didn’t have any other cars either. Not exactly sure how you can overbook rental cars, but the girl behind the counter said that they were still expecting two more drivers, and they had no more cars to rent out?! Anyway, I blame Expedia for this too.  I booked my rental car through Expedia, and USUALLY when you book a car through the airline, it automatically sets the time you will get there for when your flight lands. But for some reason Expedia decided that I would be able to pick up the keys on my way to Boston first, so they set up the rental agreement to start at 10 am. True, it was my responsibility to double-check the rental time, but remember how I said it took 1 hour to book flights and a car? I didn’t remember what time my flight was supposed to get in. I was just glad I remembered what DATE I was flying in.

Rental car girl set me up for a rental car for the morning, and I finished waiting for my luggage. I’m still waiting for my luggage. Because Dr. Frank-N-Furter doesn’t know how her job works. My bag is still in Toronto. Apparently I was supposed to get it off the conveyor belt in Toronto and go through customs with it, and then re-check the bag. NOT WHAT I WAS TOLD IN HOUSTON. (Sign #12).

So I called a cab from the airport and waited. And waited.

People came and left in taxis. Mine never came.

I called again, and the guy on the phone said that there had been an accident and he was trying to re-route a taxi to me.

I waited some more. Finally I gave up and called a different cab company. A lady who had just walked in asked if I was waiting for a cab, and when I said yes, she said, “well, there is one down there upside down in a ditch. I bet that one was yours.”

The other cab company showed up within a few minutes, and it turned out that the upside down cab was in fact the one that was supposed to be picking me up. Apparently, my driver, Dan, told me, that that guy is a horrible driver and I should be glad I wasn’t in the car with him. He is actually banned from driving with the company that did pick me up. Wow. (Sign #20).

Dan was really nice. Everyone is Canada is really nice. That’s the only saving grace for this trip so far. He told me of a place where I can see Polar Bears while I’m here. I liked Dan.

Dan only takes cash. The first cab company advertised that they took Visa and Master Card, which was why I called them in the first place. I had enough cash for Dan luckily. He took my American money. Phew.

I got to my hotel and they had my reservation. You know why? Because I booked THIS through Hotels.com. I love Hotels.com. Anyway…

I told the lady at the front desk that I’m expecting a bag, so if they could call me when it comes in, that would be great. Even if it comes in at midnight. I just want my bag.

I went to my room and saw a restaurant in the hotel with a couple people sitting at the bar. I was starving. All I had eaten all day was a breakfast sandwich and three bags of airline pretzels. I went to my room, checked to make sure the wifi was working (because I didn’t think about international charges on my phone, so I’m not sure what to do about that), and I told Hubby that I was safe and sound via Facebook messenger.

I went to the restaurant and asked if I could still order dinner. She said all she had were what basically breaks down to as TV dinners. For $7. I don’t care. I’m starving and I don’t have a car to go anywhere else.

I got her to heat up a shepherd’s pie, and while I was waiting I had a wonderful Canadian lager. I sat and talked with a guy named John for a while, and like all Canadians, he was very nice. I finished my beverage and asked how much I owe. She said $12.50. I said do you take Visa?

No, cash only.

FACEPALM.

A restaurant in a hotel that doesn’t take cards when the hotel does? I tried to use the ATM and it wouldn’t read my card.

John paid for my dinner and I ate in my room.

$7 dinner
$7 dinner

To be fair, I usually travel with cash. But my reasoning behind it was, I RARELY use it, especially when I am on company trips, and I wasn’t about to spend money switching to Canadian currency when I was just going to be here for a couple days. Everyone takes cards these days, anyway, right? Lesson learned.

I lost track of how many signs there were that this little Texas girl was going the wrong way. That something just doesn’t want me to be in Canada. But maybe it was just a bad day.

But tomorrow is another day.

Tomorrow there might be Polar Bears.

polar bear